Star Trek: Phase II

 
Please login or register.

Author Topic: the origin of Star Trek's popularity  (Read 1592 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline AlecWest

  • Crew
  • Starfleet Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2409
  • Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit.
the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« on: September 24, 2012, 03:05:05 pm »
I had a short article published online at NorthwestOpinions.com that mentions Phase II (and the Phase II forum).  One drawback (grrrrr).  In order to leave a comment on the article, you MUST be a member of Facebook.

http://northwestopinions.com/community-opinions/the-origin-of-star-treks-popularity/

Regards,
J. Alec West
"When you least expect it, someone may actually listen to what you have to say."
-- Maggie Kuhn, founder of the Gray Panthers

http://p2trek.com - http://farragut.novelhost.net - http://potemkin.novelhost.net
http://Trek-A-Lot.p2trek.com

Offline scifib5st

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 246
  • To Boldly Go...
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2012, 09:44:01 pm »
Nice artical Alex... You could have mentioned the cold war and the race rioits and the vetinam way but when you look at the world of TV today... it would be hard to explain where Star Trek started and now we end up with Fox News (Fair and balanced???) and Honey Boo Boo????

Progress??????

Phase 2 continues to show us all we CAN be better than we are.
Have you seen HBO's Newsroom?

Offline astoundingbruce

  • Recruit
  • *
  • Posts: 32
    • Astounding Bruce Carroll
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2012, 09:53:15 pm »
... it would be hard to explain where Star Trek started and now we end up with Fox News (Fair and balanced???) and Honey Boo Boo? ???

Progress? ??? ??
I have noticed recently that we have lost something in America that was intrinsic to television 30+ years ago. Back then, most television shows (at least the fictional ones) had some sort of moral that was explored. When I first noticed, I thought it was just Saturday Morning fare, but as I've seen more reruns, that seems to have been the norm, at least for Prime Time.


I wonder what happened....
Go boldly!

Offline mos6507

  • Recruit
  • *
  • Posts: 10
    • Fem Trekz
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2012, 05:08:33 pm »
Shows like Gunsmoke used to be real moralistic also.  It wasn't just Star Trek, that's for sure.  I think this faded away some time in the Reagan years.  I hate sounding like a fundamentalist Christian or something because I'm not religious, but the only message you really get these days is hedonism.  Old fashioned values like helping the unfortunate, teamwork, finding better understanding between different groups, etc... That's rarely expressed in our entertainment choices.


Offline astoundingbruce

  • Recruit
  • *
  • Posts: 32
    • Astounding Bruce Carroll
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2013, 09:58:48 pm »
That was me! My daughter asked that, and I thank you for your answer. She did watch part of the Abrams' movie with me and was fascinated (pun intended) by Spock and the Vulcans, so there is hope.
Go boldly!


WANT TO SEE MORE EPISODES AND QUICKER RELEASE TIMES?
THEN DONATE TO HELP US MAKE MORE STAR TREK PHASE 2!!!

Visit here to find out more:
>>>HELPING PHASE 2<<<
Even a dollar or three a month helps!!!




Offline qoSagh

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 226
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2013, 10:20:56 am »
One of the best example of exploring morals was All in the Family, a show that most think couldn't be made to day because Archie would be censored for "hate speech", yet you needed Archie versus whoever, be it Meathead, or Sammy Davis or even George and Lionel Jefferson to make it work. They had to be different. Think about Savage Curtain, when Lincoln called Urhura a "charming Negress" and Urhura had that quick line about not being offended by words anymore. Yet today words are almost seen as more hurtful than they were back then.

Offline Admiral Barnett

  • Recruit
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2013, 02:46:37 am »
Nice artical Alex... You could have mentioned the cold war and the race rioits and the vetinam way but when you look at the world of TV today... it would be hard to explain where Star Trek started and now we end up with Fox News (Fair and balanced???) and Honey Boo Boo????

Progress??????

Phase 2 continues to show us all we CAN be better than we are.
Have you seen HBO's Newsroom?

I have, and there's NOTHING wrong with it. It is the depiction of a real-life newsroom, and what goes on in one, warts and all.

Offline scifib5st

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 246
  • To Boldly Go...
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2013, 08:54:20 pm »
The first 6 minutes of the first episode of HBO Newsroom the best and honest TV shot in the last decade!!   :wise: 8)

Offline barbreader

  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1013
  • 53 Year Old Turtle... keep those teenagers!
    • Star Trek Reviewed
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2013, 11:04:44 pm »
Nice article.  Of course, you could write a book on this.  But I think the elements you picked were good ones.

I agree with some of the other comments.  The changes in the way people lived from 100 BC to 1776 were far less dramatic than the changes and advances that had taken place from 1776 to 1966.  Although there has been some continued advancement, particularly in computers, and there is more to come, particularly in genetics, it has not been at the pace of the time leading up to the 1960s.  My father, alive and 93, used to run after cars that drove up his street when he was a kid because they were odd, and yell, "Get a horse."  His mother who was still working in the 1960s, was born before the flight at Kitty Hawk.  The rapid advancements witnessed by those generations left people feeling anything was possible.  And the idea of community, society and common good had not been denigrated to being "Socialism" or "Communism" unless you did it through a religious organization.  Government wasn't per se 'the problem, not the solution.'  A firefighter who worked for the government wasn't suspect if he came to help you put out a fire.  I like to point out that the US put about 1 per cent of it's total GNP into the space program in the 1960s, and you didn't have somebody yelling 'waste, fraud, and abuse' every time they tried to create a technology which didn't pan out.   

Using Wikipedia, the economy of the US in 2012 was roughly $15.7 trillion.  If NASA was given 1 per cent of that, it would be $157 billion.  It's actual budget was 17.7 billion, a little over 1/10 of that. 
« Last Edit: July 08, 2013, 11:06:56 pm by barbreader »

Offline AlecWest

  • Crew
  • Starfleet Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2409
  • Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit.
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2013, 01:49:54 pm »

Using Wikipedia, the economy of the US in 2012 was roughly $15.7 trillion.  If NASA was given 1 per cent of that, it would be $157 billion.  It's actual budget was 17.7 billion, a little over 1/10 of that.


(conspiracy-theory mode)  I'm guessing that "globalization" is at the heart of NASA de-funding - the notion that future space exploration should be a "planetary" endeavor as opposed to a "national" endeavor.  In the Star Trek world, globalization had already occurred before the first Federation vessel set sail into the cosmos.  Assuming manned space exploration beyond regular I.S.S. trips is in our future, it seems that NASA de-funding is putting the globalization cart before the horse.  But, in any event, a global "united" Earth is what Gene Roddenberry envisioned.  To the "true believer" in that end-result, the end of nationalist chest-beating and flag-waving has to come first ... one way or another.

When the "Eagle" landed on the moon, the astronauts planted a U.S. flag on lunar soil.  Kinda makes a trekker wonder which flag they'd like to see planted on Martian soil (or the soil of any other space destination).  This is especially true if the soil is already occupied by sentient aliens.  Kinda like Columbus planting a Spanish flag in the soil of the New World ... while a few million indigenous residents looked on in puzzlement.

P.S.  Imagine a world where NASA (National Aeronautics & Space Administration) has been replaced by IASA (International Aeronautics & Space Administration) - where nations "combined" their funding for space exploration and put that funding under the control of scientists, not politicians (end conspiracy-theory mode).

P.P.S.  I'm a long-time participant in the SETI@Home project.  When I set up my original account at Berkeley, I used the "Professor Barnhardt" username - and still use it today.  Still under development - http://barnhardt.novelhost.net.  And, I'm curious if anyone else participates.

Regards,
J. Alec West
"When you least expect it, someone may actually listen to what you have to say."
-- Maggie Kuhn, founder of the Gray Panthers

http://p2trek.com - http://farragut.novelhost.net - http://potemkin.novelhost.net
http://Trek-A-Lot.p2trek.com


WANT TO SEE MORE EPISODES AND QUICKER RELEASE TIMES?
THEN DONATE TO HELP US MAKE MORE STAR TREK PHASE 2!!!

Visit here to find out more:
>>>HELPING PHASE 2<<<
Even a dollar or three a month helps!!!




Offline NoBloodyABCorD

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2013, 11:47:44 am »

(conspiracy-theory mode)  I'm guessing that "globalization" is at the heart of NASA de-funding - the notion that future space exploration should be a "planetary" endeavor as opposed to a "national" endeavor.


I suspect it has more to do with belly-button economics.  Non-profit scientific exploration is of little interest to the majority of Americans, either due to simple complacency (if it ain't improving their iPod they d/n care abt science or tech), personal greed (wanting the $ to go to one's own pocket, somehow) or to shifting demographics where the new blood is barely hanging on w/what they have, thus not really thinking of the more-than-immediate future. 

Offline AlecWest

  • Crew
  • Starfleet Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2409
  • Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit.
Re: the origin of Star Trek's popularity
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2013, 01:46:05 pm »

I suspect it has more to do with belly-button economics.  Non-profit scientific exploration is of little interest to the majority of Americans, either due to simple complacency (if it ain't improving their iPod they d/n care abt science or tech), personal greed (wanting the $ to go to one's own pocket, somehow) or to shifting demographics where the new blood is barely hanging on w/what they have, thus not really thinking of the more-than-immediate future.


Yup, hehe.  That's what my article said, pretty much.  My generation was the "go where no man has gone before" generation.  Today's generation is the "what's in it for me?" generation.  Ultimately, though, I'd rather see scientists studying the surfaces of alien worlds than nationalists planting flags.  And, Gene Roddenberry himself envisioned a world where exploration (and government) was "global."  Can you imagine what could be accomplished if all the money spent on the world's different military entities was spent on science?  Sadly, I feel that the only way we'll get rid of all the pointy-hatted goose-stepping military entities is if the human race experienced an "immediate" global catastrophe, forcing us to put aside nationalistic concerns - or evolved from homo sapiens to homo supernus.  That'll probably take another million years - if we're still around as a species.

Regards,
J. Alec West
"When you least expect it, someone may actually listen to what you have to say."
-- Maggie Kuhn, founder of the Gray Panthers

http://p2trek.com - http://farragut.novelhost.net - http://potemkin.novelhost.net
http://Trek-A-Lot.p2trek.com

PENFIELD MUSEUM
THE PENFIELD MUSEUM - 703 Creek Road - Crown Point, NY - (518) 597-3804Home of the "3rd Annual Halloween Haunted Homestead - 2012"

 

Powered by SMF 2.0 RC4 | SMF © 2006–2011, Simple Machines LLC
SMFAds for Free Forums
Hosting and Server Administration by a.i.Built, Inc on WarpServer 02.
ModernDark64 design by Bloc
STAR TREK and all related marks, logos and characters are owned by CBS Studios Inc.
This website, the promotion thereof and/or any exhibition of material created by
the operators of this website are not endorsed or sponsored by or affiliated
with CBS/Paramount Pictures or the STAR TREK franchise.

Page created in 0.925 seconds with 32 queries.